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Sixteen Mile Creek, Areas 2 and 7

Subwatershed Planning Study (SPS)

In January 2000, the Town of Milton released the Sixteen Mile Creek, Areas 2 and 7 Subwatershed Planning Study (SPS). That study provided the environmental framework, in terms of constraints, opportunities, policies and targets/objectives to facilitate the pending land use planning studies supporting Milton's growth plan.

The first two of three areas of residential urban expansion, referred to as Bristol Survey (Phase 1) and Sherwood Survey (Phase 2), and the first of two employment areas of urban expansion, the 401 Business Park, all made use of the SPS to plan the natural heritage systems, stormwater management and overall environmental management system.

Periodically, fundamental and governing documents like the SPS required updating due to new policies, technology, science and changing directions. In the Spring of 2007, the Town of Milton consulted with Conservation Halton and others on the need and approach to updating the 2000 SPS.

Status and Timing of Work

Field work was initiated in late summer 2007 and carried through until the end of 2007. Dry weather, along with the need to consider critical spring environmental periods, necessitated further inventory work to take place in the spring of 2008.

Analytical and assessment work followed the field work to provide updated information on constraints and opportunities for new urban development. As part of this activity, the contemporary policies and guidelines of the Federal, Provincial, and Local levels of government were considered, such that the resulting direction for environmental management is fully compliant with agency expectations.

The SPS is complete in final draft form. The SUS provided direction to the planning of the Derry Green Corporate Business Park Secondary Plan Area (the second of 2 employment areas of urban expansion) and to the Boyne Survey Secondary Plan Area (the third of three residential areas of urban expansion) of Milton's Growth Area.