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  • Care and Maintenance of Street Trees

This document is available in an accessible format upon request:

The Town of Milton plants new street trees for the health and well-being of our environment. Large street trees provide cleaner air, cooler building temperatures and beautify our neighbourhoods.

If you have recently received a new street tree or have planted a tree on your own property, please follow these simple steps to ensure the tree remains healthy for years to come:

Watering Trees

  • During periods with little or no rain, and when no watering ban is in effect, water your tree twice a week; when the weather is cooler, such as in the spring or the fall, water less frequently.
  • Be careful not to over water your tree as this may cause the leaves to turn yellow and fall off.
  • When watering your tree, provide the equivalent of about 2.5 cm (one inch) of water. Set up a garden hose to trickle water at the base of your tree for about 30 minutes or use a watering can to apply approximately
    25 - 30 litres (6 - 8 gallons) of water.

Soil and Mulch Around Your Tree

  • Do not add soil or too much mulch around the trunk as this may cause decay of the trunk and possibly cause the tree to die.
  • An organic mulch of shredded bark or wood chips is beneficial for your tree to retain soil moisture, moderate soil temperatures and reduce competition from grass and weeds. When mulching your tree, provide a layer of 5 - 10 cm (2 - 4 inches) of mulch over the root area. Do not create a "volcano" of mulch at the base of the tree or add stones, pavers or bricks around the tree. These activities could cause the tree to show signs of stress and trees could potentially die as a result of such activities.

Tree Stakes

Tree stakes are only required to support your tree for two full growing seasons. If tree stakes in your boulevard need to be removed, please contact us as noted on the left of this page.

Trouble With Your Street Tree?

Please report your concern to the Engineering Services Department using the contact information on the left side of this page so staff can track tree issues in your neighbourhood. 

If you live in a newer area which has not yet been assumed by the Town, Engineering Services will contact the developer on your behalf. "Assumed" and "Assumption" are terms used to describe the process of the Town taking over the responsibility for all municipal works in a new development, including street tree works.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. I did not receive a street tree but my neighbours have received one. Was my house missed?

Trees are typically designed to be placed every 9 to 12  metres within the right-of-way. (The right-of-way defines the limits of the public roadway next to your home, which includes the sidewalks, roads, and often the street trees.)

You may not have received a tree because of a site or utility conflict, such as a setback from driveways, street light or cable box, which prohibits planting of a tree. (A setback is the required minimum spacing between objects to ensure visual safety, proper access to utilities, and/or to limit disturbance to trees.) Some of these utilities, such as sanitary connections, are underground and are not visible at the surface.

Your subdivision developer may have itemized a street tree in the Purchase and Sale Agreement of your home; however, the payment goes toward the streetscape of the subdivision as a whole and not for individual trees for specific lots. Payment of this money does not mean that your home or lot will necessarily have a street tree in the boulevard. 

2. My street tree is dead/appears stressed. Who do I call?

Report your concern to the Engineering Services Department using the contact information on the left side of this page so staff can track tree issues in your neighbourhood.

3. I would like to add soil, mulch and/or a garden bed around my street tree.  Can I do this?

Please do not add soil around the trunk as raising the level of soil over the tree's roots may decay the base of the trunk.  Decay in the trunk may allow invasive insects to enter the tree, as well as limit the tree's ability to take up water; however, an organic mulch of shredded bark or wood chips is beneficial for your tree to retain soil moisture, moderate soil temperatures, and reduce competition from grass and weeds. When mulching your tree, provide a layer of 5 - 10 cm (2 - 4 inches) of mulch over the root area. As noted above, please do not create a "volcano" of mulch at the base of the tree or add stones, pavers or bricks around the tree. These activities could cause the tree to show signs of stress and trees could potentially die as a result of such activities.

Additional Information